Empowerment, Inspiration for Change, Videos, Wake Up Calls, Women in Business Why You Don’t Invest In Yourself, and 4 Critical Ways to Start – Work You Love Episode 13 Written by: Kathy Caprino
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Greetings, and welcome to Work You Love – Episode 13!

My Forbes post this week on The Top 5 Reasons Women Resist Investing In Themselves and How It Hurts Them generated so many powerful comments, emails, questions and reactions (including a radio interview with Charles Adler in Canada!) that I wanted to share my thoughts via video with you on what holds women back from saying YES! to investing in their own growth, and what we can do about it starting today.

Here’s my take:

I’d love your candid feedback. Do you resist spending both time and money on your own development? Why? And what outcomes are you denying yourself because of it?

Please share your candid thoughts and comments below, and most importantly, PLEASE – make an investment in yourself today.

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15 thoughts on “Why You Don’t Invest In Yourself, and 4 Critical Ways to Start – Work You Love Episode 13”

  1. investing in myself was something I waited so many years to do because someone else was always first on my list. With the help of loans I got my degree. In many ways the delay in combination with the economy and my own lack of confidence in myself are still holding me back. I now see the value but since I have spent years in early childhood education I am finding it hard to get people outside the industry to see the types of skills I have developed. Even with my degree I am just not getting interviews. It is very frustrating since I am stuck at a poverty level income. I am very glad for inspirations like those I get by reading your post. I appropriate that you share some of your knowledge for free so those of us who know we need to invest in our self but don’t have resources can.

    1. Tawny – Thanks so much for sharing. I truly sorry to hear of the challenges you’re facing. You’re not alone in waiting years to invest in your own growth. And in tough times, our confidence can get rocked as we struggle to get interviews and be recognized by hiring managers. I’d suggest taking advantage of any affordable career services and networking opportunities your local community offers, and finding new ways to talk about, highlight and demonstrate your talents and gifts. Sometimes that’s all it takes – a small, positive shift in energy and hope can open doors for us. Thanks again, and all best.

  2. Thanks for the video – I can identify with a lot of the things you have said/ written.

    My problem is that I know I need to change and move on, I’m willing to make the investment but I don’t know where to go next.

    I’ve been in the same field for around the past 15 years and have reached a certain level but two things have become obvious. First, I’m completely bored with what I’m doing, second, I have no idea what I want to do next or how to transfer my skills.

    I will be fifty this year and though intellectually I know I am not to old to start again, and in fact need to do something new, I feel that I don’t have the energy or what it takes to start again.

    Anyway, thanks for the inspiration, it helps to start moving forward to a more positive frame of mind.

    1. Hi Alison – Thanks for sharing. You’re not alone – thousands feel the same way, and I did too for years, about not knowing what else we can do with our talents but being desperate to change. I offer a number of resources, posts, and information (I’d start with my book Breakdown, Breakthrough) that can guide you from “I don’t know what I want,” to “I know what I want and I know how to get it!” My Amazing Career Project 16-week video training series is designed to help you do just that. I’d recommend making an investment this month in something that compels you. There is great help out there for your situation. All best.

  3. Wow Kathy – you were talking directly to me! I don’t invest in myself! I always feel I need to be doing something for someone else (including the dog which I now groom). I started investing in myself last year by getting a personal trainer who helped me lose 20 pounds but I’ve allowed myself to slip right back into the old routine that got me there in the first place. Now I’ve gained 10 of those pounds back.
    Alison said exactly what I’ve been feeling and I just turned 50 in April (insert Alison’s comments here). I’m one of the thousands out there.
    So there’s no need to reply Kathy – I’ll just insert your reply to Alison here! 🙂 Thanks to you for offering this information!! The time is NOW!

    1. Thanks so much for sharing, Denise. I’m thrilled to hear that you did invest in yourself recently with great results – you can get back to that mode MUCH more easily now that you know how it feels to operate in the world in that way. You just need someone in your corner to help you be accountable to yourself for that. Please reach out to someone in your life who you trust and admire, who’ll be honest with you, and who believes in you without reservation, and ask them to help you stay on track with investing in yourself. Go for it! Thanks again.

  4. Thanks for your book and website. I really enjoy the skills that you bring and your talent in how they are delivered. I am okay with investing in myself, even though I don’t have a large disposable income. I enjoy some aspects of my job, but it is definitely time for a change. I am in a creative field (classical and jazz trumpet player) and have freelanced and taught a large private studio successfully for many years, but the challenges of being single and a solopreneur are making me feel isolated. I need to move sideways somehow, or go back to school because the hours are getting to me at this point. There is also a point at which you must move in to group programs and not just the 1:1 to make more money. I’m 51, and have the whole midlife thing going on. You mentioned that your hub is a jazz drummer, and you sing, so I’m hoping you are familiar with the scene. Can your program be helpful for me? I am really lacking clarity, and did go back to school five years ago, but it was a decicision made with my head and not my heart. Thank you.

    1. Hi Barb – Thanks for sharing your thoughts. Please check out my programs at kathycaprino.com/coaching-services and see if they resonate for you, and fit your budget. I’d be happy to explore them with you and see if we’re a good fit. I’ve lived and breathed the challenges of making a great living in a creative field, and can certainly offer insights on that front. Let me know if the descriptions of my programs resonate with you. Happy to be of service. If private coaching is out of your budget, I highly recommend my Amazing Career Project 16-week career success video training program. Thanks.

  5. Kathy,

    I found myself nodding along with you as the words you spoke resonated with me, as I’m sure they have for every woman who’s been fortunate enough to hear your video.

    I became a single mom and a high school dropout at 18 years old and have steadily broken my way through any barriers I felt necessary to succeed in life. By 42 years of age, while working full-time, I have obtained a GED, graduated college with a 3.84 GPA and a bachelor’s degree in business, earned a PHR certificate in human resources and written a children’s story that won first prize in a local library contest. According to my gauge, that amounts to a life worth living…and one that I intend to continue living.

    Regardless, I’m inspired by your words and will eagerly promote your message to anyone seeking guidance. Bless you and all the lives you touch along the way.

    1. Thanks so much for sharing a bit of your story, Dede. You’ve overcome so much and achieved potent life dreams. Kudos to you! Thanks for your comments, and for inspiring us.

  6. Hi Kathy,

    I actually had a note stuck to my computer screen for a while that said ‘don’t ask for permission, ask fro forgiveness’! Caused a raised eyebrow from my team-lead, but it did help me to act on issues myself that didn’t need senior approval.

    I still struggle with excuses 2-5 that you mentioned, in particular, the return on investment, as there are several times that I have invested in something and then not followed through (as you know) but I have bought your book today, breakdown, breakthrough and will go through it in detail. One small step!

    Thanks for all you do,

    Kat Kent

  7. Hey Kat – Thanks so much for sharing. I think many of us have struggled with these – you’re certainly not alone. The key, I believe, is to gain greater awareness when we’re doing it, so we have greater choice to move beyond them. Thank you for buying Breakdown, Breakthrough – I hope it paves the way for an exciting breakthrough for you!

  8. Hi Kathy,
    First, thank you, thank you, thank you for the inspiration and the amount of information you put forth without charge.
    I too, am at a crossroads point not only careerwise but on a personal level (currently going thru divorce).
    The company I worked for has gone through restructuring, so I got “restructured” back in October 2016.
    I’m still figuring out the exact path I want to take which doesn’t necessarily include working for someone else, nor being locked-up in an office from 9 to 5. I have two girls who are also going through their own rough time –teenagers– so they need to be given time and attention.
    Which of your books would you recommend to me as a must-read, since this is one investment I can afford right now.
    Again, thanks for all your help,
    Miriam

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