Advice, Breakthroughs, Careers, Empowerment, Inspiration for Change, Kathy Caprino, Support for Change, Videos, Women in Business Why Attaching To One Outcome Is The Wrong Strategy For Career Success Written by: Kathy Caprino
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Welcome to Episode 12 of Work You Love!

Today, I’m tackling a great question from Rick about why it’s the wrong move to overly-attach to one particular outcome when you want more professional success and reward.

Rick asks:

“Kathy – I’ve heard you speak about the idea that “attaching to a specific outcome” is the wrong approach. But I’m at a point as a Director in branding and communications where I feel I’m ready to be a VP and earn significantly more than I am right now, and definitely want to pursue that.  How is attaching to that outcome not a good idea?”

Terrific question! Here’s my take:

 

The key takeaways from today’s video are:

1. “Attaching” means you’re looking at one particular outcome to solve all your problems.

2. Figure what you want, then what you REALLY want.

3. Uncover what’s in the way of what you want, and how are you a part of the obstacle or impediment.

4. Be very open and flexible to new ways that you can create, build and achieve what you desire.


Today’s tweetable:

Don’t attach to one outcome as a way out of your pain. Identify what you REALLY want, and open the doors for that experience. @kathycaprino

Click to tweet:  http://ctt.ec/aUzuf

I hope that’s helpful!

Enjoy your week, and wishing you many happy breakthroughs.

Kathy

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6 thoughts on “Why Attaching To One Outcome Is The Wrong Strategy For Career Success”

  1. Wow! I’ve received some weekly emails from Kathy after I downloaded a form to fill out about career change. As I’m in grad school now ~ making a major career transition in the process ~ her advice seemed timely and pertinent to me. This particular communication is particularly inspiring and makes me think I may have been able to ‘dodge a bullet’ by heeding the advice before I ventured too far down the rabbit hole of poorly motivated goal setting: I have already started to think of the position level and income I think I’ll ‘need’ once I rejoin the workforce. Focusing on what I really want is obviously a much better strategy! Thanks for the sage advice, Kathy!

    1. Thanks, Margret! I’m so glad to hear that this message got through, and you can now start to focus on what you REALLY want! That’s music to my ears. All best wishes pursuing what will make you the most happy (and bring you the most success and fulfillment).

  2. I felt like your message was spoken just for me. Thank you for your messages. They really make me think about what I really want for the remainder of my career and have helped me make some important decisions.

    1. I’m so glad this video spoke to you personally and the material helped you sort out some important decisions. The most important takeaway is to identify what you REALLY, deeply want, and not to be distracted by outer “success” measures like title and money, when in fact, what you want is much, much more. Thanks and all best!

  3. In reference to the video blog about letting go of what you hate to do what you love: I graduated law school last year and passed my state’s bar. I’m still looking for a job, and meanwhile I’m working on a document review. I already know I went to law school out of intellectual curiosity and probably some desire to shirk the responsibilities of the “real world,” with no particular drive to be a lawyer or any particular kind of lawyer. My interests are women, animals, and the environment. I don’t even hate the document review; it’s a lot better than other jobs I have done in my life (I went to law school after a series of low-level administrative jobs). But, it is a lot of hours with the commute and it is leaving me a zombie, even impairing my ability to think. I have agreed with a law website to write for free and the document review is impinging on my ability to do even that. Meanwhile, I’m not at a financial level where it would be at all in my interests to “let go” of the review altogether – it would be plain stupid. Is there a way to focus mentally on the writing and focus in on my interests while I am doing this job? I want to create something to look forward to by feeling positive about the writing and figuring out how to use what I have to help where I care.

  4. The thing that resonated with me on listening to that video was the passing reference to shaping the strategic direction of an organisation I care about. That’s the thing I really want! now finding the organisation and the ways 🙂 Thanks. this one is helpful…

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